(100) Words About Movies

People I follow

I right words about movies.  *disclaimer* I'm no expert, I just know what I like

Sidebar by Theme Static

(via altjband)

ifc:

Secret handshake, go!

ifc:

Secret handshake, go!

tastefullyoffensive:

Anatomy of Films [wronghands]

Previously: Anatomy of Songs

(via thefilmfatale)

This Flashback Friday is brought to you by Disney Channel with a special thanks to the repressed memories of my childhood. I would like to know  what disney executive thought this was suitable for children? I was around five when this movie came out and it terrified me. I still won’t casually dangle my feet off the bed in fear of being dragged under my bed by a forgotten imaginary friend. 

Don’t Look Under the Bed (1999)

I can rest east knowing this was Disney second and final attempt at a children’s horror movie ( REALLY?! A “children’s horror movie” that should be an oxymoron)

sundancearchives:

Writer/director Craig Johnson’s Skeleton Twins was supported by the Sundance Institute Creative Producing Lab and Summit in 2009 before premiering during the 2014 Sundance Film Festival and winning the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award.Craig Johnson’s second feature sensitively explores Maggie and Milo’s lives of quiet desperation with remarkable finesse. It unfolds a rich backstory through subtle interactions between its characters and finds the agility to be funny, melancholic, touching, and devastating within the space of a single scene. Kristin Wiig and Bill Hader give astonishing, dramatic performances. Their connection to the characters and to each other is magical, emotional, and hilarious. Check out Johnson’s Meet the Artist interview from the Festival here.Skeleton Twins opens on Friday, September 12.Film still by Reed Morano

sundancearchives:

Writer/director Craig Johnson’s Skeleton Twins was supported by the Sundance Institute Creative Producing Lab and Summit in 2009 before premiering during the 2014 Sundance Film Festival and winning the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award.

Craig Johnson’s second feature sensitively explores Maggie and Milo’s lives of quiet desperation with remarkable finesse. It unfolds a rich backstory through subtle interactions between its characters and finds the agility to be funny, melancholic, touching, and devastating within the space of a single scene. Kristin Wiig and Bill Hader give astonishing, dramatic performances. Their connection to the characters and to each other is magical, emotional, and hilarious. 

Check out Johnson’s Meet the Artist interview from the Festival here.

Skeleton Twins opens on Friday, September 12.

Film still by Reed Morano

futureoffilm:

Data From a Century of Cinema Reveals How Movies Have Evolved

fuckyeahmovieposters:

Tob Waylan

Jim Jarmusch poster set (2/3):
Night on Earth
Dead Man
Year of the Horse
Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai

The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967)

Although I still dislike the movie I can appreciate the technique and brilliance of the movie. Especially this scene where the Ben and Amelia should be filled with joy, the happiness is short-lived and they return to looks of confusion of both their decision and with life. Accompanied by Sound of Silence it connects the uneasiness of this scene to past ones where Ben was unsure of himself and what he wanted from life. Leaving the viewer unsure about how are this relationship can go, and if Ben finally found what he wanted out of life.

sansaspark:

During the scene when Mulan decides to go to war instead of her father, she decides to do it while sitting on the foot of the Great Stone Dragon. The image of the dragon looking over Mulan is repeated several times throughout the sequence, and the bolts of lightning strike at significant times whenever the dragon is in sight. When Mulan takes her father’s scroll and when she is praying to her ancestors, the Great Stone Dragon can be seen. It is also engraved on the sword Mulan uses to cut her hair and the handles of the wardrobe containing the armor are in the shape of the dragon’s head. The dragon’s eyes glowing in the temple symbolizes Mulan’s role as protector of her family awakening, instead of the actual dragon.

The reason Mushu couldn’t wake the dragon is because the dragon was no longer there. Mulan is implied to be the Great Dragon that protects her family.

(via nationalfilmsociety)

jxson:

The Little Rascals, 20 years later.